Winter adventures in Jemez National Forest

12.26. New Mexico
It happened that on Christmas vacations we spent three days in Albuquerque. The shutdown closed the parks and monuments, winter storm threatened to close roads in the mountain, and Albuquerque wasn’t the worst place to be.
These three days were the test of my planning skills. I rebooked hotel, changed routes and planned stops on a fly. Jemez National Forest wasn’t in my original plans nor in my plan B. But when I reread my notes from the travel blogs and books about New Mexico and found this beautiful place, I felt saved. It was one of the most eventful days.

Soda Dam and Soda Falls

It was my first winter waterfall. And it was so unique!
Officially, Soda Dam, not Soda Falls, is a place where water from underground hot springs pushes its way to the surface. With the time minerals formed a natural dam that blocks the Jemez River and forms falls.
12.26. New Mexico

12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico

12.26. New Mexico

12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico

Spence Hot Spring

It just happened that snow started when we were already high in the mountains. White snowflakes added a mystery to the surrounding landscape. We stopped at the first open parking and went exploring, there was a trail, so we hiked it.
We walk for half a mile, reached the creek, explore the area but didn’t cross the bridge.
After that day, I googled where we hiked only to realized that the trail leads to hot springs. We were almost steps away from them.
The trailhead has a beautiful view overlooking the mountains.
12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico

12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico

12.26. New Mexico

Winter hike to Jemez Falls Overlook

Disclaimer: we hiked the trail. However, I would prefer to snowshoe it. The snow was too dip in few places for my legs in the boots.
Also disclaimer: though the official site tells nothing about operational seasons, the parking lot of Jemez Falls Group Area site was closed. We parked outside of the gates.
Snow became heavier when we arrived at the gate of Jemez Falls Group Area and Campground. Gates (as expected) were closed. So we parked near them.
The trail is short, we didn’t plan to spend a lot of time there, so falling snow didn’t scare us.
I don’t know how the area looks during the summer season, but in snow it was spectacular.
Closed gates added another mile to the hike but scenery looked great, and I enjoyed every step.
12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico
The trail itself starts near the picnic area. It wasn’t our first in snow hike, but the depth of snow and unknown terrain made it harder to orient and search for the directions. At one time, I opened the Alltrails app, loaded their map and followed someone’s recording.
12.26. New Mexico
The trail ends with the viewpoint over the falls. Viewpoint has a railing which prevented me from taking a shot I wanted. However, the view was amazing. Falls freeze almost entirely except the central part.

12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico

Elk of Rd 126

From the parking, near Jemez Falls Group Area we turned back. Snow stormed reduced views, shutdown closed both Valles Caldera and Bandelier National Monument on the east. So we drove west. The goal was Fenton Lake State Park.
Few miles after the intersection of La Cueva, we noticed a car stopped on the opposite side of the road.
We slowed and noticed elk in the woods. A flock of that size we last saw in Redwood National Park. They noticed humans but didn’t hurry to the left the meadow surrounded with pines.
12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico

12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico

What was a surprise when we drove the same road back, and they still were there. Amazing animals

Fenton Lake State Park

12.26. New Mexico
I had only a few shots from the park, but we were lucky to have it for ourselves. The park has several trails but only two opened in winter. We walked along the shore than the trail goes inland and becomes a ski trail rather than hiking.

Stormy dusk above Jemez River

When we already turned back, the radio announced a winter hazard. The storm that came that day was the heaviest in years (as I read somewhere). We were lucky to have at least one good day to explore the mountains!
12.26. New Mexico
12.26. New Mexico

Links and Info

  • The useful map with all sites: link and this one
  • Soda Dam on alltrails.com
  • Spence Hot Springs Trail on alltrails.com
  • Jemez Falls Overlook Trail on alltrails.com and on Forest Service USDA site
  • Fenton Lake State Park official site. Admission was $6 (December 2018)
  • Soda Dam is ~62 miles north from Albuquerque. The whole trip with the hikes and stops took 5 hours. Jemez Falls Overlook is also around 60 miles west from Santa Fe. Check road conditions before traveling.

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