Views around Puget Sound

Seattle named for Chief Sealth, leader of Duwamish tribe that lived in Lake Washington area.
When the first European settlers landed on Alki Beach on cold November 1851,
Chief Sealth and his tribe were those who met them.

07.04. Alki Beach

I could not say I planned this day well enough. Today I would do it a different way. Though now it doesn’t matter. After leaving the woods surrounding Mt Rainer and getting back to the land of the cellular coverage, we headed to the Seattle to spend the day here and stay in the Everett then to leave on the next day to the Olympic peninsula. Overnight in Everett was planned taking in account my initial wish to drive to the Deception Pass. But weather forecast changed and I found way more interesting places to visit on the Hood Channel. But the hotel was already booked and even prepaid so nothing could be adjusted.
I got few places in and around Seattle I wanted to visit. Though I didn’t take in the consideration that it would be the 4th of July celebration and the city would felt like a crazy anthill.

Alki Beach

First, we drove to the Alki Beach.
Alki Beach, the first municipal beach on the West Coast has a great view of the Seattle downtown from the one side and the Olympic Mountains from another.
07.04. Alki Beach
07.04. Alki Beach

Seattle Downtown

It’s told Space Needle was designed based on the napkin scribblings of Eddie Carlson, the organizer of World Fair.

And then we stopped in the downtown. Wheather was brilliant. My previous visit had way more worth forecast, so I enjoyed familiar places in the sunshine.

07.04. Seattle
07.04. Seattle

I had plans to stop for the views at Capitol Hill (immediately crossed out because we spent too much time walking waterfront) and Gas Work Park. Gas Works I wanted to see badly! The place is excellent and has the best downtown view. What I didn’t know is how MANY people would drive here to sit on the grass and wait for fireworks. The traffic was horrific!

Mukilteo

While widely believed that Mukilteo means “good camping site” some sources tell in Snohomish dialect Muk-wil-teo is a “narrow passage”.

At the same time small town, Mukilteo felt like a right place to spend the rest of the day: near the water, far from the city, and it has a lighthouse 🙂

07.04. Mukilteo
07.04. Mukilteo
07.04. Mukilteo
07.04. Mukilteo

07.04. Mukilteo

07.04. Mukilteo
07.04. Mukilteo
07.04. Mukilteo
07.04. Mukilteo

Point No Point

On January 26, 1855, at Handskus was signed The Treaty of Point No Point by which tribes of the northern Kitsap Peninsula ceded ownership of land in exchange for small reservation and hunting and fishing rights.

Next day we drove all the way from Everett to Olympic and stopped at Hadskus northern tip with the funny name Point No Point. I found this place because of its lighthouse, but the warm sand and lovely views persuaded us to stay here for a complete lunch break.
07.06. Point No Point

07.06. Point No Point
07.06. Point No Point

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